Mining industry and indigenous peoples: regulations, best practice and social innovation


Social acceptance
3 235 000 SEK

Ongoing

2017-10-01

Luleå tekniska universitet

Karin Beland Lindahl

2020-10-31

Purpose and goal
Sweden has experienced an increased level of conflict over mine establishment, particularly in relation to indigenous land use. This project aims to develop tools to manage Swedish land use conflicts involving industry, indigenous communities and the state by drawing on Canadian comparisons and experience. More specifically, it will compare social licensing (SLO) and mine establishment across Swedish and Canadian jurisdictions to explore the role of the regulatory frameworks and identify well-functioning practices in relation to indigenous rights and land use.

Structure and implementation
This project builds on a comparative research design offering a variation of cases in terms of institutional context, social mobilisation and corporate strategies. Two Swedish and three Canadian cases will be analysed qualitatively and compared. First, key issues in relation to SLO will be identified. Second, the selected cases will be analysed to identify best practices and to explore the role of the regulatory framework and indigenous rights. Third, the results will serve as a basis for joint learning and social innovation developing tools to manage Swedish land use conflicts.

Expected results
Improved knowledge about causes of and challenges in land use conflict with respect to institutions, corporate practices and indigenous land use and rights, will help handle conflicts in more efficient and legitimate ways. By drawing on international comparison, best practice solutions for the Swedish situation will be developed through learning and social innovation involving key stakeholders. Better knowledge about the role of institutions for SLO will enable Swedish policy makers to create conditions that support mutually beneficial interactions between company and community.

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